Volunteers clean up Fort McHenry Wetland

Published October 27, 2011

Together, what can 83 volunteers accomplish on a Saturday morning? In just four hours on Saturday, September 24, these volunteers, along with the Aquarium Conservation Team (ACT!), removed 23,839 pieces of debris from the Fort McHenry Wetland in support of National Public Lands Day and the International Coastal Cleanup. “Before I went through this experience, I never knew there was so much trash out there,” was one volunteer’s response to the overwhelming sight of the Patapsco River shoreline.

Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine is a well-visited piece of history for both Baltimore residents and out-of-town visitors. The Fort McHenry Wetland, located adjacent to the Fort, can be seen from the popular walking path. As one of the very few living shorelines in Baltimore City, the 8-acre Fort McHenry Wetland is well functioning, doing exactly what it's meant to do: remove excess nutrients from the water; provide habitat for local wildlife; and filter the marine debris that is carried in from the tide. Since 1998, ACT! has hosted multiple community-supported debris cleanups here.

Volunteers have dedicated 250 hours to remove the urban debris (aka trash) and maintain the butterfly and rain gardens located on the site. Partners for this event included the Steinweg Baltimore, Maryland Port Administration, REI, Royal Bank of Canada, Constellation Energy, Maryland Environmental Trust, Toyota, and the National Park Service. To participate in a future Fort McHenry Field Day or another ACT! event, sign up to receive the Aquarium's Conservation e-newsletter, and we'll let you know about upcoming conservation events.

Previous Post

Featured Stories

Marie Tharp the harp seal Animal Rescue Update: Harp Seal Admitted

National Aquarium Animal Rescue is currently caring for a female harp seal nicknamed Marie Tharp.

Read the full story

Cold-stunned turtle on beach Rescue to Release, Part 1: Is Climate Change Increasing Cold-Stunned Turtles?

Every year, when cold weather starts to hit the East Coast, hundreds of endangered, cold-stunned sea turtles wash ashore in Cape Cod Bay.

Read the full story

Related Stories

Winter in the Chesapeake Bay

Published January 22, 2019

WeGo: Bringing the Aquarium to Critically Ill Children

Published November 08, 2018