Thoughtful Thursdays: The Nature of Learning

Published May 17, 2012

In early May, the Aquarium Conservation Team (ACT!) spent two days at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge engaging students in activities focused on climate change and its effects on the diamondback terrapin.

Partnering with staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, students were led through activities including a wetland planting promoting terrapin habitat, a GPS scavenger hunt to illustrate field monitoring techniques, and a nature walk along the butterfly garden, surveying the local bird population.

Prior to this field trip, Aquarium staff visited the students in their classrooms as part of an introduction to climate change, as well as terrapin characteristics and husbandry. Schools selected to participate are part of the Aquarium’s Terrapins in the Classroom program, a head-start program in which students care for and observe a newly hatched terrapin they will ultimately release into natural habitat at the end of the school year.

All activities were made possible through the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Nature of Learning grant. The Nature of Learning grant encourages educators to “use National Wildlife Refuges as outdoor classrooms to promote a greater understanding of local conservation issues.”

In all, the Aquarium engaged more than 100 students in climate change activities, while educating students on how to be stewards of the Chesapeake Bay.

You can too! The Aquarium offers habitat restoration opportunities to promote a healthy Bay. Sign up for one of our free events today! Together our actions and awareness will create a healthy environment for Maryland's state reptile, the diamondback terrapin.

Previous Post

Featured Stories

Staff releasing rescue sea turtle on beach Animal Rescue Update: April Rescue Turtle Release

Yesterday, National Aquarium Animal Rescue released 36 rescue turtles from Little Talbot Island State Park in Florida!

Read the full story

Artificial oyster reef in Baltimore's Inner Harbor Harbor Happenings: Artificial Oyster Reef

The National Aquarium is taking another step to revitalize Baltimore’s Inner Harbor and attract native species with a new artificial oyster reef using shells from the Oyster Recovery Partnership!

Read the full story

Related Stories

Chesapeake Bay Underwater Grasses: Resurgence and Restoration

Published March 23, 2018

Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Published September 02, 2017