Thoughtful Thursday: New Biofluorescent Species Discovered!

Published January 09, 2014

The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) announced today that a team of researchers and scientists has identified close to 200 species of biofluorescent fish!

Biofluorescence refers to an organism's process of absorbing light, transforming it and ejecting it as a different color. This process is different from bioluminescence, which is the conversion of chemical energy into light. 

These 180 species of biofluorescent fish glow in a wide range of colors and patterns. The science community is still hypothesizing over the exact purpose of the light, potential uses include everything from communication to mating.

Did you know? Although it covers more than 70 percent of our planet's surface, over 90 percent of the ocean remains unexplored. In that uncharted world, experts believe that up to two-thirds of the ocean's plant and animal species still await our discovery!

To get more information on AMNH's research on biofluorescence, click here.

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