SOLD OUT: We have sold out of tickets for today, December 9, 2018.

An Update On Our Biohut Restoration

Last June, in partnership with Biohabitats, Inc. and ECOCEAN, the National Aquarium installed eight biohuts along the bulkheads in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. We’re excited to announce that after a successful trial run, we’re expanding the program!

Published April 17, 2015

So far, we’ve documented 18 different species visiting the existing biohuts, including grass shrimp, blue crabs, American eels, sea nettles, pink comb jellies and more! Yesterday, six new biohuts were added along the Aquarium’s Pier 3 and four were installed at Masonville Cove.

biohuts-masonville-cove

Biohuts help restore some of the ecological function once provided by the natural landscapes of the Inner Harbor. Oysters serve as biological filters by filter feeding and removing algae from the water, while the empty, outer cage provides predator-free shelter for juvenile native fish.

They also allow us to monitor species diversity and abundance in the Harbor. The team is also monitoring the growth of the oyster spat. The information collected from the biohuts is shared with the Maryland Biodiversity Project.

The Aquarium’s conservation project manager Charmaine Dahlenburg says the biohuts are important because we can’t conserve what we don’t know we have. “Everything we find is new and exciting, because we’re adding it to a list that never existed. Wildlife in urban areas is often underrepresented. With this baseline information we can build each year to study patterns and changes in the Harbor and Baltimore City.”

Stay tuned for more updates on our biohabitat program!

Previous Post

Featured Stories

WeGo at the National Aquarium WeGo: Bringing the Aquarium to Critically Ill Children

A pilot program at the National Aquarium brings the wonder of the world’s aquatic treasures directly to children in local hospitals.

Read the full story

Octopus eye Octopuses: Extraordinary Eyesight

To celebrate World Octopus Day, learn more about the octopus’s remarkable eyesight!

Read the full story

Related Stories

2015 Recap: Conservation Wins

Published December 09, 2015

Restoring Baltimore's Inner Harbor, One Biohut at a Time

Published August 18, 2014

A New Life for the Inner Harbor

Through the innovative use of biohabitats, our Conservation team is revitalizing the Inner Harbor's struggling ecosystem!

Subscribe on Youtube