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Animal Update: Spotted Lagoon Jellies

Spotted lagoon jellies are now on exhibit in Jellies Invasion!

Published August 19, 2016

spotted-lagoon-jellies

Spotted lagoon jellies are native to lagoons, bays and lakes in the South Pacific. The jellies’ environment is crucial to their well-being. They have a symbiotic relationship with algae. These jellies are kept under special metal halide lights which allows algae to photosynthesize. The jellies then consume the waste product of the algae as their main source of energy.
 
While the majority of the jellies’ energy comes from this algae, they also capture prey with their oral arms! These arms, which dangle below its bell, have multiple mouths which consume food as it’s caught.
 
While their coloration can be similar to that of blue blubber jellies, you can identify these jellies based on their spots!
 
Stay tuned for more updates!

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