Another nautilus!

Published April 16, 2008

Another chambered nautilus has been added to the Sensing exhibit, located in the Surviving through Adaptation gallery on level 3. The nautilus is related to the octopus, clam, and squid, which, like the octopus, are all cephalopods (which means “head-foot”).

The nautilus is the only cephalopod with a fully developed shell for protection. It has poor vision, and more than 90 tentacles which do not have suckers. Their tentacles grip prey and deliver it to its crushing, parrot-like beak. The chambered nautilus at the Aquarium is fed crab, shrimp, and fish. A newly hatched nautilus is about the size of a quarter. 

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