An unchanged world

Published January 07, 2009

Of all of the places on earth to visit, The Galapagos Islands have been rated one of the top 7 and the trip is said to be a galapagos-piclife-changing experience. With so many beautiful places to visit on earth, what makes these islands so special? The native species of plants and animals have remained relatively the same since the days of Charles Darwin’s visit in 1835 as the islands are located 600 miles from the mainland. So, in a world that is filled with constant change and the creation of new things, these islands present the rarity of the unchanged. Visitors are limited to itineraries that are set by the Ecuadorian government. In fact, many areas of the Galapagos National Park are not available for visitation to help manage the impact of people on the ecosystem. And in the areas where visitors can roam, no one is allowed to touch, feed or harass the wildlife.  Before leaving one island and travelling to another, visitors must clean off the soles of their shoes to eliminate the transfer of any plant or animal species from one island to another, as the flora and fauna of each island is unique to that island. Seem like a lot of rules? Maybe. But it’s these set of rules that make the islands so fascinating. It’s conservation in its truest form. In June, the National Aquarium will embark on an 8 day cruise led by a naturalist and will visit 9 of the 13 main islands of the Galapagos. For more information on how you can join this excursion, click here!
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