Spring cleaning with the Conservation Team

Published April 26, 2011

The Aquarium Conservation Team (ACT) took "spring cleaning" to a whole new level, taking part in two large-scale debris cleanups in April. The first was part of a joint effort between the Curtis Bay and Brooklyn Coalition, Port of Baltimore, Living Classrooms Foundation, Maryland Conservation Corps, ACT, and Baltimore City to revitalize Farring-Baybrook Park, in south Baltimore. The cleanup started with a day of work with the Maryland Conservation Corps to clear invasive vines and downed trees from along the main walking path in the park, which follows a small stream. Baybrook Cleanup As part of the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay’s Project Clean Stream efforts on April 2, 75 volunteers collected 150 garbage bags full of debris and hoisted various objects like couches, mattresses, and bicycles out of the streambed. In total, the hard work resulted in 6 tons of debris and plant materials removed from Farring-Baybrook Park! Our contribution was a valuable addition to the 4,900 volunteers and 150 tons of trash collected at 217 Project Clean Stream sites on April 2. Fort McHenry Field Day On April 16, as part of National Volunteer Week, 105 dedicated volunteers braved the wind and rain to help us collect debris at a Field Day at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine. Despite a thorough drenching, volunteers picked up enough plastic bottles, polystyrene foam products, aluminum cans, and driftwood to fill a huge dumpster, adding to the overall Project Clean Stream impact. Special thanks to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Bank of America, Constellation Energy, and Solo Cup Company, whose groups could not be deterred by the weather and came out to the event in force! Our next Fort McHenry Field Day will be held on National Public Lands Day, Saturday, September 24. We hope you'll join us!
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