Animal Updates - March 1

Published March 15, 2013

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we're bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what's going on... here's what's new this week!

Batfish surgery

An orbiculate batfish currently being cared for at our Animal Care Center (ACC) is recovering nicely after being surgically treated for a lump on his side.

The batfish is one of the many animals we have currently undergoing quarantine before being placed in our Blacktip Reef exhibit! As soon as staff noticed the small mass, they began doing a variety of diagnostic tests, including aspirations , cultures and ultrasounds to try and determine the cause.

Once the mass began to grow, the decision was made by animal health staff to remove it surgically.

batfish surgery

We're happy to report that the fish did well throughout surgery and a 1.5 x 1.5 cm lump was identified and removed. The cyst was sent to our partners at John's Hopkins to further investigate the cause. The batfish is being treated with pain medication and antibiotics and is has "recovered swimmingly!" After being housed alone for immediate recovery, he is now back with other fish and his scar is barely noticeable!

As you can imagine, surgery on such a fragile and small animal takes patience and precision! We're lucky to have such a dedicated and talented team to provide the best care for our animals!

We'll be sure to keep you updated on the condition of our batfish and be sure to tune in next week for another update! 

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