Blacktip Reef Species Spotlight - SHARKS

Published August 06, 2014

In celebration of Blacktip Reef’s first anniversary (this Friday, August 8th!) , we’re highlighting some of the awesome animals that call our newest exhibit home!

Blacktip Reef Sharks

Take one look at our colorful reef and you're sure to spot our sleek school of blacktip reef sharks, the exhibit's namesakes!

Blacktip Reef Shark

Commonly found in the reefs and shallow, inshore waters of the Indo-Pacific, the blacktip reef shark are known for their sleek build and the black "tips" on its dorsal and caudal fins. Blacktip reef sharks can grow to be up to six feet in length.

The typical diet of a blacktip reef shark includes small fishes, invertebrates (mostly octopus) and shrimp. Here at the Aquarium, our sharks are scatter fed a nice mixture of restaurant-quality fish and squid!

Zebra Sharks

Joining our school of blacktip reef sharks in this exhibit is our pair of zebra sharks, Zeke and Zoe!

National Aquarium – Zebra shark

Did you know? These zebras lose their stripes! As juveniles, zebra sharks have dark bodies with yellowish stripes. As they mature, their pattern changes to small dark spots.

Zebra sharks can be found in the western Pacific Ocean (from Japan to Australia), the Indian Ocean and the Red Sea.

Wobbegong Sharks

Wobbegong sharks are proof that sharks come in all shapes and sizes!

Tasselled wobbegong

Wobbegongs have wide, flat bodies that are covered in darker lines and splotches that help them perfectly conceal themselves within their reef homes.

Also known as "carpet sharks," there are 12 species of wobbegongs found worldwide. Blacktip Reef is home to two species: the tasselled wobbegong and the ornate wobbegong!

Check back all week as we continue to celebrate the one-year anniversary of Blacktip Reef!

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