Animal Update - January 31

Published January 31, 2014

Sailfin Sculpin in Surviving Through Adaptation

Two sailfin sculpins have been added to the Feeding gallery of our Surviving Through Adaptation exhibit.

national aquarium sailfin sculpin

Also known as the "eye-banded sailor fish," sailfin sculpins are found through the eastern Pacific ocean - from Alaska to southern California. This species prefers to stay along the shoreline where there are lots of rocky, algae-covered crevices.

Did you know? Their common name is derived from the sail-like fin that sits on top of their heads!

Plumose Anemones Added to Surviving Through Adaptation

Two plumose anemones have also been added to our Feeding gallery!

national aquarium plumose anemone

Plumose anemones are common from southern Alaska to southern California. Young specimens will often form dense colonies on pilings, floats, breakwaters and jetties in bays and harbors.

These animals are easily recognized by their tall, column-like bodies, which are topped with a "plume" of many short oral arms.

To feed, these anemones sweep passing seawater with their tentacles to filter out zooplankton!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

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