Happy Cephalopod Awareness Week!

For the next five days, we’ll be joining octo-enthusiasts from around the world in celebrating Cephalopod Awareness Week.

Published October 06, 2014

Giant Pacific octopus

There are over 700 living species that belong to the class Cephalopoda (a name derived from Greek meaning “head-footed”). The general build of these animals includes a head, which contains all of the cephalopod’s organs, and the foot, which can consist of many appendages. At its center, the cephalopod has a sharp beak made of keratin (the same material that makes up our hair/fingernails)!

Cephalopods, including the well-known octopus, cuttlefish, squid and nautilus, inhabit all of the world’s oceans and can be traced back almost 500 million years.

Cephalopod Pictograph

Cephalopods are highly-intelligent creatures. In fact, they have the biggest brains of any invertebrate. Their cunning nature and ability to disguise themselves perfectly against almost any background make them worthy predators!

Stay tuned for a week full of cephalopod features right here on WATERblog!

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