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Gardening for Wildlife

Support wildlife and clean water by creating a certified wildlife habitat and native garden!

Published April 24, 2015

Currently, the biggest threat to our nation’s water is contaminated runoff from yards, farms, roadways and construction sites, otherwise known as non-point source pollution. 

Actions taken in your own yard to attract wildlife and protect our aquatic habitats can provide a wide range of benefits that reach far beyond our local waterways. What you do in your yard can affect not only the local wildlife, but also the soil and water quality of the surrounding and downstream areas!

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Here are a things you can do to create a wildlife-friendly garden or yard: 

Provide food.

Adding native plants to your yard is an easy way to provide wildlife with the nectar, pollen, berries, seeds, etc. that many species need to thrive! 

Supply water. 

Installing bird baths is an easy (and decorative) way to provide animals a clean source of water.

Create cover. 

Native shrubs, thickets and brush piles provide refuge for wildlife to safely hide from inclement weather and predators!

To certify your yard as a wildlife habitat, click here!

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