A Spring Surprise for Rain Forest Staff! 

We are very excited to announce the birth of a baby sloth in the Upland Tropical Rain Forest!

Published April 03, 2015

baby sloth

The baby, named Felize in honor of a long-time volunteer, was born on March 30. 

Felize is the fifth sloth to be born here at the National Aquarium and the third baby for mother, Ivy, who came to our exhibit in 2007. Felize’s father, Xeno, was born at the Aquarium in 2010. 

Staff has been monitoring mom and baby closely since discovering the birth and are happy to report that Felize appears to be nursing well! Felize will remain close to Ivy for nearly a year before independently exploring the exhibit. 

baby sloth

In order to give the pair enough time to bond, our staff is waiting to determine Felize’s gender. 


A Bit About the Species

The sloths here at the Aquarium are Linne’s two-toed sloths. 

Nocturnal by nature, sloths are more active at night—but not for long! These animals can sleep up to 20 hours a day, curled up in the fork of a tree.

baby sloth

The Linne’s two-toed sloth is commonly found in South America’s rain forests, where it lives among the treetops for most of its life. With two claws on its front feet and three on the back, it’s perfectly designed for an arboreal life. In fact, sloths even mate and give birth while hanging upside-down!

To learn more about the species, click here.

Previous Post

Featured Stories

Jellies in petri dish Welcome to the Jelly Jungle

Deep inside the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET) building, the National Aquarium runs a little-known lab. Here we carry out the propagation of jellies, many of which later end up on exhibit in Jellies Invasion. Read on for a peek into the process!

Read the full story

Cold stunned turtle Cold Stunning: Where, How and Why?

Picture this: You’ve just spent a wonderful, late summer week on Cape Cod, swimming in the ocean and enjoying the sunshine with friends and family. As fall sets in, you know it’s time to head home. You get on the highway, but something strange happens … despite driving for hours, you end up back where you started. You feel sluggish, confused and exhausted. If you were a turtle, you just might be cold-stunned.

Read the full story

Related Stories

Baby Sloth Update: Meet Fern

Published April 29, 2016

Happy Sloth Week, Friends!

Published June 26, 2014