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Animal Update: Green Moray Eel

A green moray eels has been added to the Lurking exhibit!

Published November 27, 2015

Green Moray Eel

Did you know? Green moray eels are actually brown. This animal’s namesake greenish tint comes from a protective yellow mucus that covers its body.

Green morays are nocturnal predators and rely primarily on their sense of smell to locate prey, such as fishes, crabs, shrimp and squid.

These eels habitually open and close their mouths, showing off their sharp teeth. While this behavior may appear threatening, the animal is actually just breathing! The motion moves water over the gills and out the vent-like openings at the back of the eel’s head.

Stay tuned for more behind-the-scenes updates!

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