A Blue View: Bay-friendly Seafood

The Chesapeake Bay is chock-full of delicious—and sustainable—seafood. It’s all about smart choices, seasonality and sometimes venturing outside of your comfort zone.

Published October 20, 2015

There are a few surprising species out there in the Bay that make a good meal, like the snakehead or the blue catfish, both considered invasive species.

catfish
Image via Wiki Commons.
 
The blue catfish was introduced to the Chesapeake Bay in the 1970s. It’s a large fish with smooth skin and characteristic whiskers. An opportunistic feeder, its diet ranges from insects and crustaceans to worms, plant matter and other fish.
 
Because it’s not naturally found in the region, the blue catfish has few predators and its population has rapidly expanded. In fact, you can find them in nearly every major tributary of the Chesapeake Bay.
 
Its overabundance is also a threat to native species, making this fish a great, albeit unconventional, sustainable seafood choice.

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