14 Ways to Love the Ocean

Here are a few ways to show our blue planet some love this Valentine’s Day:

Published February 10, 2016

ocean love

Start at home. What you do in your home and your yard has downstream effects on our rivers, bays and oceans. Fertilize less (or not at all), discontinue use of herbicides and pesticides and don’t dump chemicals into your drains.

Discover what is beneath the surface. It is hard to escape the respect and awe you will feel once you’ve immersed yourself in it. Become a certified SCUBA diver – or check out some of the amazing animals and habitats at the National Aquarium!

Leave only footprints. Enjoy your time out in the natural world, but do your best to leave only footprints behind! When we leave traces (read: litter) behind in parks or at the beach, we disrupt the lives of the plants and animals we love so dearly. 

Protect ocean habitat. Look for ways you can protect or restore vital ocean ecosystems. 

Become a citizen scientist. There are many researchers out there that need your help in collecting important environmental data! You can help report marine debris, identify species and track invasives. 

Drive less. As distant as it seems, our greenhouse gas emissions on land are directly linked to ocean acidification. If we decrease the concentration of these gases in our atmosphere, we can help the oceans maintain a healthy balance.

Learn to share. We share the ocean with an amazing array of plants and animals. Slow down when boating near marine mammals and sea turtles, make sure you retrieve any lost fishing line and watch animals from a distance to ensure their safety and yours.

Eat sustainable seafood. Seafood is a very healthy meal option, but make sure the fish you eat is caught or farmed responsibly.

Eat locally. Locally grown food options cut down on transportation in the supply chain and are fresher alternatives.

Ditch the plastic. Plastic pollution is one of the most visible threats facing our oceans. Find ways to reduce the amount of disposable plastics you use in your daily routine.

Definitely ditch the microplastics. Microplastics are the tiny plastic particles that show up in popular personal care products, like face scrubs. These plastics are washed immediately down the drain and into our nearby rivers and streams after use. Although hard to see with the naked eye, microplastics are seriously damaging the health of our oceans.

Visit or support a National Marine Sanctuary. Similar to National Parks on land, these sanctuaries are areas set aside to help protect vital ocean resources.

Stay inspired. Check out our live exhibit cams or Instagram for a quick dose of inspiration!

Share it with your family. Form cherished memories by spending time with your family at the water's edge. It will heighten your appreciation of both!


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