Happy Mother's Day!

In celebration of Mother's Day this weekend, we are continuing our tradition of introducing you to amazing animal moms:

Published May 04, 2016


Red-knobbed Hornbill

hornbill

Did you know? When it’s time to lay her eggs, female red-knobbed hornbills will find a large opening in a tree trunk, build a nest and seals themselves inside with their eggs. They stay in the nest for the eggs' entire two-month incubation period to protect their young!

Discus 

Discus

Parent discus fish feed their young on mucus that they secrete over their bodies until they grow big enough to forage on their own. 

Giant South American River Turtle

Giant Amazon River Turtle

Researchers have discovered that giant South American river turtles can communicate back and forth with their hatchlings, which helps their young migrate to the right location. The parents communicate with their young while underwater using low-pitched calls!

Convict Cichlid Fish

convict cichclid

Convict cichlid fish are extremely caring and protective parents. Both parents remain involved in guarding their offspring against predators, and they engage in behaviors to assist their children, including digging paths through plants for their children, and stirring up pebbles on the ground to uncover food!

Here’s to all the amazing moms out there! 

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