Animal Update: Pacific Coral Reef

Five new species of fish have been added to our Pacific Coral Reef exhibit!

Published November 18, 2016

Black Spot Angelfish

Male and female black spot angelfish are actually different colors! Females are yellow and blue, while males are marked with vertical red stripes over its pale-colored body. These reef dwelling fish can be found throughout the Indo-Pacific. These fish follow an omnivorous diet, which includes algae and zooplankton.

Brush Tail Tang

Brush tail tangs are brown-colored fish with protruding snouts from their slender bodies. Also found in the Indo-Pacific region, these fish can live at depths up to 200 feet. Brush-tail tangs feed primarily on filamentous algae and even have specialized teeth to do so!brushtail-tang

Hawk Anthias

Hawk anthias can be found near coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific. They have also been known to live near caves, ledges and other drop-offs. Anthias species all share the trait of being hermaphroditic. If a dominant male perishes, the largest female of the group will often morph to take its place.

Yellow Pyramid Butterflyfish

The yellow pyramid butterflyfish is native to the tropical reef environments of Hawaii, Indonesia and New Caledonia. The coloration of these fish, especially their black heads, help them camouflage as they hide within the reefs. As omnivores, they scour the same reefs to feed on plankton and algae.pyramid-butterflyfish

Powderblue Surgeonfish

Powderblue surgeonfish are named for the pale blue color the covers most of their bodies and the raised spine located at the base of the tail, which resembles a surgeon’s scalpel. Like other surgeonfish, these fish are herbivores and feed on benthic algae located on the ocean floor. At times this fish can be aggressive, especially over feeding territories, and can even use their "scalpel" as a defensive mechanism.

Stay tuned for more behind-the-scenes updates!

Previous Post

Featured Stories

Jellies in petri dish Welcome to the Jelly Jungle

Deep inside the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET) building, the National Aquarium runs a little-known lab. Here we carry out the propagation of jellies, many of which later end up on exhibit in Jellies Invasion. Read on for a peek into the process!

Read the full story

Cold stunned turtle Cold Stunning: Where, How and Why?

Picture this: You’ve just spent a wonderful, late summer week on Cape Cod, swimming in the ocean and enjoying the sunshine with friends and family. As fall sets in, you know it’s time to head home. You get on the highway, but something strange happens … despite driving for hours, you end up back where you started. You feel sluggish, confused and exhausted. If you were a turtle, you just might be cold-stunned.

Read the full story

Related Stories

Animal Update: Freshwater Angelfish

Published January 20, 2017

Animal Update: Pygmy Angelfish, Fantail Darter and Kole Tang

Published September 30, 2016