Chesapeake Bay Week Species Spotlight: Searobins

Searobins are unique fish that are seasonal visitors to the Chesapeake Bay!

Published June 07, 2017

Northern searobins travel to the lower Chesapeake Bay in the spring in search of warm water. They stay through early winter, when they move offshore or to warmer southern waters.northern-searobin-on-exhibit

Their winged pectoral fins, sharp spines and flat head give the searobin an unusual appearance. They have two separate dorsal fins—one smooth, and one spiny—and grow to be 12 to 16 inches in length.

Searobins are bottom-dwellers and use modified pelvic fins to uncover prey while they scurry across the bottom of the Bay and other bodies of water. Their diet consists of shrimp, crab, bivalves and other fish. 

It’s Chesapeake Bay Week! Stay tuned for more updates as we celebrate the Chesapeake Bay all week.

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