Animal Update: Lion’s Mane Jellyfish

Lion’s mane jellyfish are now on exhibit in Jellies Invasion!

Published March 10, 2017

These are the largest known species of jellyfish, growing from a half inch to up to eight feet in diameter. A lion's mane's tentacles are clustered into eight groups and can grow as long as 120 feet in length. Their common name comes from the yellow and red coloration of this jelly’s tentacles which looks like the mane of a lion!

lions-mane-jellies

Lion’s mane jellies are native to the cold waters of the arctic, Northern Atlantic and Northern Pacific. They subsist on zooplankton, small fish, shrimp and even other, smaller jellies.lions-mane-jelly

Reproduction changes for these jellies as they mature. Like other species, young lion’s mane jellies can reproduce asexually. When they reach full maturity, however, they reproduce sexually. The females carry the fertilized eggs in her tentacles until they become larvae.

Stay tuned for more behind-the-scenes updates!

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