Species Spotlight: Flower Hat Jellies

Learn more about this striking jelly species, found in our Jellies Invasion exhibit!

Published July 06, 2018

Flower hat jellies are a semi-benthic species and in their natural habitats, they rest on sea grass or algae with their tentacles hanging down to capture prey—mostly small fishes. In Jellies Invasion, you can find these jellies resting on a grate in their exhibit space, with their long, fluorescent tentacles trailing underneath.

These tentacles illuminate under the blue light in Jellies Invasion due to a green fluorescent protein in the jellies’ bodies. In their natural habitats, flower hat jellies can use their fluorescence to attract prey. Unlike most other species, flower hat jellies also have tentacles on top of their bells, which can grow up to 6 inches in diameter.

In addition to their fluorescent tentacles, flower hat jellies can be identified by the dark pinstripes adorning their translucent bells.

Stay tuned for more updates!

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