Happy Jellyfish Day!

Jellies can be found in waters across the world, and we’re highlighting those closest to home to celebrate Jellyfish Day!

Published November 03, 2018

If you think there aren’t any jellies in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, think again! There are actually four common species found in the harbor–the Atlantic bay nettle, lion’s mane jellies and two different species of comb jellies.

Atlantic sea nettle

Atlantic bay nettles are the easiest to spot, thanks to their bright white coloration and their tendency to congregate in large groups during the warmer months. These nettles are one of the jelly species most commonly associated with the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The Inner Harbor is not the only place that you can see Atlantic bay nettles—we also have them here at the Aquarium!

The world’s largest jelly species, the lion’s mane jelly, can grow to be up to 120 feet long and is also often spotted in the Inner Harbor. The lion’s mane and Atlantic bay nettle jellies are both known to sting, while the two comb jelly species found in the harbor don’t even have stinging tentacles!

Lion's mane jellies

Comb jellies are the most common jelly species in the harbor and the Chesapeake Bay, but their translucent appearance and lack of visible pulse makes them the hardest to spot. Since they don’t have a pulse, they rely on water currents to move.

Along with Atlantic bay nettles, our Jellies Invasion exhibit is currently home to a variety of jellies including upside-down jellies, spotted lagoon jellies, Pacific sea nettles, purple-striped jellies, blue blubber jellies and more! Jellies Invasion is not the only place to find jellies in the Aquarium—our interactive Living Seashore exhibit is home to moon jellies.

Learn more about jellies at the National Aquarium!

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