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Terrapins in the Classroom: They’re Off!

As part of our Terrapins in the Classroom initiative, 48 baby diamondback terrapins are heading to classrooms across the state to grow.

Published September 27, 2018

An effort to help Maryland’s students feel more connected to the Chesapeake Bay, the National Aquarium’s Terrapins in the Classroom program brings the state’s reptile, the diamondback terrapin, directly into classrooms, giving students the chance to come face to face with nature.

Baby terrapin

The hatchlings were collected from Poplar Island in late August and taken to our new Animal Care and Rescue Center for care. For the past few weeks, our team has closely monitored their progress through checkups, weekly weigh-ins, water changes and daily feedings.

This week, pre-selected teachers from more than 40 different schools received training and instructional lessons on terrapin care. With guidance from our experts throughout the year, the students and teachers will study, weigh, measure the terrapins every week to track their progress. Aquarium experts work closely with the classes over the course of the school year to answer any questions that arise.

Two baby terrapins

At the end of the school year, the terrapins will be brought back to the Aquarium, tagged for identification and then released back at Poplar Island. As the students part with the terrapins, we hope they begin to understand the direct impact their actions and the health of the Chesapeake Bay will have on the animal.

National Aquarium conservation education programs like Terrapins in the Classroom are made possible by support from our corporate and philanthropic partners, including Subaru.

Learn more about our Terrapins in the Classroom program!

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