Animal Health Update: Chesapeake

Our Animal Health team is closely monitoring Chesapeake, a 26-year-old female Atlantic bottlenose dolphin, who began showing signs of illness last week.

Published February 05, 2019

Update: March 2, 2019

After a period of improvement from her initial illness, our Animal Health team reports that Chesapeake is displaying signs of a new health concern. Our staff have identified that the three chambers of her stomach are not functioning properly, causing issues with her overall digestive system in the last couple of days. Our team is working diligently to treat this new issue. They continue to perform and review ultrasound tests to evaluate treatment efficacy and bloodwork to gain additional insights into her overall health.

Original Post: February 5, 2019

To date, Chesapeake has undergone the full work-up of routine diagnostic tests—including blood sampling and ultrasounds—but the cause of her symptoms remains unknown. Our team is now utilizing thermography tests, which can detect heat patterns and blood flow in body tissue. In addition to our own incredible staff, consulting marine mammal vet experts are on-site to help diagnose Chesapeake.

Chesapeake

We are happy to report that Chesapeake has regained a bit of her appetite over the last few days. Although she’s still not back to her normal self, interest in food is a positive sign.

Our Animal Health team will continue to work around the clock to provide Chesapeake with supportive care. As they adjust her treatment plan and diet in the days ahead, they’ll be looking for her appetite and energy levels to improve.

The team is also keeping a close eye on the rest of our dolphin colony, including Chesapeake’s daughter, Bayley, who appears to be behaving normally.

As we continue to treat Chesapeake, we’ll be sure to keep you updated on her status.

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